11 Comments
Jan 26Liked by Ryan Peterman

You don't get paid for time, you get paid for value

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That should always be the case. Long-term impact matters most

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Jan 26Liked by Ryan Peterman

> Don’t worry about ratings so long as you’re on track for meeting expectations at your level. In practice, next-level behaviors often lead to solid ratings anyway.

This part is key. It’s important to build some baseline credibility at the current level first before trying to push for the next one.

You don’t need to be top 1% at your current level. Management just needs to trust you enough to hand you next-level scope.

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Jan 26Liked by Ryan Peterman

This is a great wake-up call Ryan. Even though I remember how you wrote about shipping 5 features a day, I think I will remember this article even better, and hopefully pull the break when I catch myself not thinking about next level behaviour and only crunching more of the same.

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Great callout, Ryan.

Promotion requires a mindset shift first, then the work that comes along with that. Not the other way around

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Jan 26Liked by Ryan Peterman

Good rating isn’t promotion, but I would imagine when some do get promoted, their rating would definitely is beyond average, though not necessarily the top one.

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Agreed, most promotions people are exceeding expectations. They just might not be pushing into the highest ratings

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It's like realizing you've been playing Mario Kart to rack up points, but the real win is leveling up your driving skills for the next race. Chasing high ratings is great, but focusing on 'level-up behaviors' is like unlocking a secret pathway in the game.

Thanks for sharing this gem – it's a fun yet powerful shift in thinking about career growth!

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Sometimes you have to focus on ratings and sometimes in promotions. In fact, you must connect with the right people to make any of the to happen. However, bear in mind that there are many different factors also affecting the decision-maker.

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Behavioral skills is paramount to technical skills.

If you can't make other people understand what you code using your behavioral skills then your technical skills doesn't matter at all.

It would like you are superman but you just can't fly.

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Great ideas here, Ryan!

I think this is because engineers can't be reduced to the amount of code they write. Even at the startup level, I had Junior colleagues who stayed Juniors for years because they were writing code and were happy with it.

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